Month: September 2017

Brain Stimulation – Can we trust the empirical record?

Brain stimulation research has been exploding in neuroscience.  First came the rapid adoption of Transcranial Magnetic Stimulation (TMS), a technique in which powerful magnetic fields are used to create inductive currents within the skull.  More recently, Direct Current Stimulation (DCS)

Posted in Applied research, Open Science, Replication

Enthusiasm for teaching and learning

It’s a joy to be with faculty who are deeply enthusiastic about teaching and about student learning. I’m just back from AusPLAT (Australian Psychology Learning and Teaching), the first Australian conference on learning and teaching, under the auspices of the

Posted in Uncategorized

Adventures in Replication: p values and Illusions of Incompatibility

Here’s an idea I run into a lot in peer reviews of replication studies: If the original study found p < .05 but the replication found p > .05, then the results are incompatible and additional research is needed to

Posted in ITNS, NHST, Replication, Statistical graphics, The New Statistics

Something a bit different: maintaining memories

I’m wondering off the topic of the New Statistics today just to mention that my lab has published a new paper that characterizes the the changes in gene expression that accompany storing and maintaining a new long-term memory  (Conte et

Posted in Open Science, Uncategorized

Adventures in Replication: Your replication appears to be somewhat underpowered

Many journals now proclaim their openness to replication research.  Behind the scenes, though, replication manuscripts are often met with impossible demands and/or insane double-standards. Here’s an example from an editor at a prominent social psychology journal: the studies appear to

Posted in Replication, The New Statistics

The joy of many disciplines

One of the great things about working in psychology, or statistics, or–just imagine!– both, is that you can get to play in the backyards of many other folks. As science becomes more and more fragmented, and many researchers feel that

Posted in ITNS, Teaching

Adventures in Replication: Scientific journals are not scientific

The essence of science is seeking and weighing evidence on both sides of a proposition.  One might think, then, that when a scientific journal publishes a research paper it then acquires a special interest in publishing subsequent replications or commentary

Posted in Replication