Month: May 2019

The Cookie-Monster Study: The highly influential memory of a long-lost study

In psychology, there are a few studies so famous and influential that they have proper names: The Good Samaritan Study, the Asch Obedience Study, the Marshmallow test, etc, etc. Approaching this echelon is the “Cookie Monster Study”, an increasingly-famous study

Reply to Lakens: The correctly-used p value needs an effect size and CI

Updated 5/21: fixed a typo, added a section on when p > .05 demonstrates a negligible effect, and added a figure at the end. Daniel Lakens recently posted a pre-print with a rousing defense of the much-maligned p-value: In essence, the

The TAS Articles: Geoff’s Take

Preregistration: Why and How

Prereg Workshop at APS Steve Lindsay usefully posted a comment to draw our attention to the Preregistration Workshop on offer at the APS Convention coming up shortly in D.C.. You can scan the full list of Workshops here–there are lots

Judging Replicability: Fiona’s repliCATS Project

Judging Replicability Whenever we read a research article we almost certainly form a judgment of its believability. To what extent is it plausible? To what extent could it be replicated? What are the chances that the findings are true? What

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