Author: Geoff Cumming

Open Science and The New Statistics: Be Happy!

In May this year at the APS Convention in Boston, Bob and I ran a symposium with the title From NHST to The New Statistics: How do We Get There? It was great fun. There is a summary here. Next

Posted in ITNS, Open Science, Teaching, The New Statistics

ITNS at SfN17 in DC

As Bob mentioned in his post earlier today, he’s at SfN17, the enormous (30,000+ folks) Neuroscience meeting happening now in Washington DC. Here’s how the SfN site describes the meeting: “SfN’s 47th annual meeting, Neuroscience 2017, is the world’s largest

Posted in ITNS, Open Science, The New Statistics

Improving Psychological Science: The Latest From SIPS

You may recall that SIPS is the Society for the Improvement of Psychological Science. My colleague Fiona Fidler recently reported that the second SIPS conference was “probably the best conference I’ve ever been to”. When I met her the other

Posted in Open Science

The ASA Symposium on Statistical Inference: Bob’s great talk

“A world beyond p < .05." That's the subtitle for the ASA Symposium on Statistical Inference, which ran last month. Bob was there and recently posted a brief initial report. I wasn’t there, alas, but I’ve now had three independent

Posted in NHST, The New Statistics

Replication: ‘Psychological Science’ does the right thing

I have been enjoying Bob’s series of posts about replication. (Go to our home page and scroll down to see links and a few lines of text about each of the 5 posts, with title starting ‘Adventures in Replication’.) Actually,

Posted in Open Science, Replication, The New Statistics

Enthusiasm for teaching and learning

It’s a joy to be with faculty who are deeply enthusiastic about teaching and about student learning. I’m just back from AusPLAT (Australian Psychology Learning and Teaching), the first Australian conference on learning and teaching, under the auspices of the

Posted in Uncategorized

The joy of many disciplines

One of the great things about working in psychology, or statistics, or–just imagine!– both, is that you can get to play in the backyards of many other folks. As science becomes more and more fragmented, and many researchers feel that

Posted in ITNS, Teaching

“The best conference…”: More about SIPS

Here’s more about the recent SIPS Conference, from my colleague Fiona Fidler who was clever enough to be there. (Some background: Fiona, of The University of Melbourne, is among other things a psychologist, ecologist, and historian of science. Her PhD

Posted in Open Science

Today’s news from SIPS: Getting better…

A while ago I wrote about SIPS. Today came an email following the second SIPS meeting, a couple of weeks ago at COS in Charlottesville, VA. Below is some of the email: “We had an invigorating conference, and are humbled

Posted in Open Science

Open Science is not all the same: What archaeology can teach us

There’s no simple dot point way to adopt Open Science and improve the trustworthiness of science. A fascinating story from archaeology illustrates that reality nicely. First, the story. Archaeologists have long studied when the out-of-Africa spreading of modern humans first

Posted in Applied research, Open Science