Author: Geoff Cumming

Open Science Goes to the Antarctic–Well, Nearly

Have you ever met a Professor of Seaweed? No, nor had I, but now I have: Catriona Hurd. More about her in a moment. I’m just back from two highly enjoyable days visiting IMAS, the Institute of Marine and Antarctic

Banning p values? The journal ‘Political Analysis’ does it

Back in the 1980s, epidemiologist Kenneth Rothman was a leader of those trying to persuade researchers across medicine and the biosciences to use CIs routinely. The campaign was successful to the extent that the International Council of Medical Editors stated

Open Science Leaders: Dan and Steve Tell Their Stories

BTW, have you noticed that Bob has set up NewStatistics on Twitter–scroll down and see the right hand side bar. Do follow us and help spread the word. Thanks! Dan Simons may be best known as the co-author of the

Say It in Song: Go Forth and Replicate!

Jon Grahe, of Pacific Lutheran University, is an enthusiastic advocate for Open Science and, especially, for student participation in doing Open Science as a key part of education. The Collaborative Replication and Education Project (CREP, pronounced “krape”) is a great

A Fine ITNS Review on Amazon

Recently a new review of ITNS was posted on Amazon. It’s here, or go to the Amazon site for ITNS and scroll down. “This is a really fantastic statistics textbook … … Highly recommended!” I don’t know ‘Rob’, who wrote

Some Questions–Would You Care to Comment?

Blogs sometimes either elicit lots of comments, or they don’t. While writing, I’m always wondering how readers might react, what they (you) might be thinking. In my most recent post I asked about experiences or thoughts readers might have about

Teaching the Forest Plot–What Do You Think?

I’ve been a bit obsessed with the forest plot for, I’d guess, close to 20 years. Partly because I love pictures, partly because the forest plot can tell us so much. I regard it as the beautiful face of meta-analysis.

See you in San Francisco?

I’m delighted to report that our symposium proposed for the APS Convention next May has been accepted. (BTW if you visit that site for the Convention, note the happy people in the top centre pic–our panel from the 2017 Convention.)

Open Science matters, it really matters

I’ve written before about this year’s meeting of SIPS. My colleague Fiona Fidler reported that it was “probably the best conference I’ve ever been to”. Fiona also reports that the closing address at the meeting was a personal story told

Statisticians see the light–Hooray!

“Scientific Method for the Twenty-First Century: A World Beyond p

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