Category: Applied research

Open Science DownUnder: Simine Comes to Town

A week or two ago Simine Vazire was in town. Fiona Fidler organised a great Open Science jamboree to celebrate. The program is here and a few of the sets of slides are here. Simine on the credibility revolution First

Cabbage? Open Science and cardiothoracic surgery

“The best thing about being a statistician is that you get to play in everyone’s backyard.” –a well-known quote from John Tukey. Cabbage? That’s CABG–see below. A week or so ago Lindy and I spent a very enjoyable 5 days

A Wonderful Panorama of Statistics

Bob and I have been off-air for a while, but we haven’t gone away. I’ve been meaning for ages to blog about a wonderful book. Here it is: Sowey, E., & Petocz, P. (2017). A panorama of statistics: Perspectives, puzzles

It’s not just Psychology: Questionable Research Practices in Ecology

Today’s fine article from The Conversation is: Our survey found ‘questionable research practices’ by ecologists and biologists – here’s what that means The authors are Fiona Fidler and Hannah Fraser, of The University of Melbourne. Fidler and Fraser surveyed 807

Randomistas: Dare we hope for evidence-based decisions in public life?

I’ve just listened to a great 20-min podcast, published by The Conversation. The podcast is here. It’s an interview by my colleague Fiona Fidler with Anthony Leigh, about his recently released book: Randomistas: How Radical Researchers Changed Our World. Published

Open Science: This Time in Orthodontics

Last month it was the Antarctic Scientists, this month the Orthodontists, and once again I had a most enjoyable time. Lindsay my wife and I are just back from 5 days in Sydney. I was speaking at the 26th Australian

What Medicine Can Teach Us About Low Probabilities: A Personal Experience

I’m recently home after 10 days in hospital. It was meant to be a simple procedure, home the next morning, but two low probability complications arose. I was largely out to it for a few days, but then I was

Open Science Goes to the Antarctic–Well, Nearly

Have you ever met a Professor of Seaweed? No, nor had I, but now I have: Catriona Hurd. More about her in a moment. I’m just back from two highly enjoyable days visiting IMAS, the Institute of Marine and Antarctic

Memories fade..but something remains

This isn’t a statistics post–it’s about Bob’s neuroscience research.  Most long-term memories are ‘forgotten’–meaning that recall becomes less and less likely.  Psychologists have long known, though, that forgetting is complex, and that fragments of a memory can remain.  For example,

Brain Stimulation – Can we trust the empirical record?

Brain stimulation research has been exploding in neuroscience.  First came the rapid adoption of Transcranial Magnetic Stimulation (TMS), a technique in which powerful magnetic fields are used to create inductive currents within the skull.  More recently, Direct Current Stimulation (DCS)

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