Category: Applied research

It’s not just Psychology: Questionable Research Practices in Ecology

Today’s fine article from The Conversation is: Our survey found ‘questionable research practices’ by ecologists and biologists – here’s what that means The authors are Fiona Fidler and Hannah Fraser, of The University of Melbourne. Fidler and Fraser surveyed 807

Randomistas: Dare we hope for evidence-based decisions in public life?

I’ve just listened to a great 20-min podcast, published by The Conversation. The podcast is here. It’s an interview by my colleague Fiona Fidler with Anthony Leigh, about his recently released book: Randomistas: How Radical Researchers Changed Our World. Published

Open Science: This Time in Orthodontics

Last month it was the Antarctic Scientists, this month the Orthodontists, and once again I had a most enjoyable time. Lindsay my wife and I are just back from 5 days in Sydney. I was speaking at the 26th Australian

What Medicine Can Teach Us About Low Probabilities: A Personal Experience

I’m recently home after 10 days in hospital. It was meant to be a simple procedure, home the next morning, but two low probability complications arose. I was largely out to it for a few days, but then I was

Open Science Goes to the Antarctic–Well, Nearly

Have you ever met a Professor of Seaweed? No, nor had I, but now I have: Catriona Hurd. More about her in a moment. I’m just back from two highly enjoyable days visiting IMAS, the Institute of Marine and Antarctic

Memories fade..but something remains

This isn’t a statistics post–it’s about Bob’s neuroscience research.  Most long-term memories are ‘forgotten’–meaning that recall becomes less and less likely.  Psychologists have long known, though, that forgetting is complex, and that fragments of a memory can remain.  For example,

Brain Stimulation – Can we trust the empirical record?

Brain stimulation research has been exploding in neuroscience.  First came the rapid adoption of Transcranial Magnetic Stimulation (TMS), a technique in which powerful magnetic fields are used to create inductive currents within the skull.  More recently, Direct Current Stimulation (DCS)

Open Science is not all the same: What archaeology can teach us

There’s no simple dot point way to adopt Open Science and improve the trustworthiness of science. A fascinating story from archaeology illustrates that reality nicely. First, the story. Archaeologists have long studied when the out-of-Africa spreading of modern humans first

NIH asks journals to make sure we get the whole story

The Open Science credo is “Get the whole story”–we can only evaluate the claims made from scientific data when we know the whole context of how that data was generated.  For example, finding a large effect of a new drug

NHST: The double whammy!

When I gave a talk at the HFESA conference, I started of course with an example of the damage done by NHST. My chosen article describes three examples in the field of road safety of how reliance on statistical significance

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