Category: Applied research

Statistical Cognition: An Invitation

Statistical Cognition (SC) is the study of how people understand–or, quite often, misunderstand–statistical concepts or presentations. Is it better to report results using numbers, or graphs? Are confidence intervals (CIs) appreciated better if shown as error bars in a graph

Play, Wonder, Empathy – Latest Educational Trends, Says The Open University

My long-time friend and colleague Mike Sharples told me about the recently released Innovating Pedagogy 2019 report from The Open University (U.K.). It’s the seventh in an annual series initiated by Mike. Each report aims to describe a number of

Open Science DownUnder: Simine Comes to Town

A week or two ago Simine Vazire was in town. Fiona Fidler organised a great Open Science jamboree to celebrate. The program is here and a few of the sets of slides are here. Simine on the credibility revolution First

Cabbage? Open Science and cardiothoracic surgery

“The best thing about being a statistician is that you get to play in everyone’s backyard.” –a well-known quote from John Tukey. Cabbage? That’s CABG–see below. A week or so ago Lindy and I spent a very enjoyable 5 days

A Wonderful Panorama of Statistics

Bob and I have been off-air for a while, but we haven’t gone away. I’ve been meaning for ages to blog about a wonderful book. Here it is: Sowey, E., & Petocz, P. (2017). A panorama of statistics: Perspectives, puzzles

It’s not just Psychology: Questionable Research Practices in Ecology

Today’s fine article from The Conversation is: Our survey found ‘questionable research practices’ by ecologists and biologists – here’s what that means The authors are Fiona Fidler and Hannah Fraser, of The University of Melbourne. Fidler and Fraser surveyed 807

Randomistas: Dare we hope for evidence-based decisions in public life?

I’ve just listened to a great 20-min podcast, published by The Conversation. The podcast is here. It’s an interview by my colleague Fiona Fidler with Anthony Leigh, about his recently released book: Randomistas: How Radical Researchers Changed Our World. Published

Open Science: This Time in Orthodontics

Last month it was the Antarctic Scientists, this month the Orthodontists, and once again I had a most enjoyable time. Lindsay my wife and I are just back from 5 days in Sydney. I was speaking at the 26th Australian

What Medicine Can Teach Us About Low Probabilities: A Personal Experience

I’m recently home after 10 days in hospital. It was meant to be a simple procedure, home the next morning, but two low probability complications arose. I was largely out to it for a few days, but then I was

Open Science Goes to the Antarctic–Well, Nearly

Have you ever met a Professor of Seaweed? No, nor had I, but now I have: Catriona Hurd. More about her in a moment. I’m just back from two highly enjoyable days visiting IMAS, the Institute of Marine and Antarctic

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