Category: ITNS

Meta-Science: It’s all Happening in Melbourne

Are you interested in meta-science? In Open Science? If so, check out the inaugural conference of AIMOS, the Association for Interdisciplinary Research &Open Science. It’s a two-day meeting, on 7 & 8 November, at the University of Melbourne. There’s an

The New Statistics Videos: 5 Years On

This week’s news email from the APS includes this interesting item: Aha, I thought, they are giving publicity to Tamara and Bob’s wonderful workshop at the APS Convention last month. Great! But the link didn’t go to the materials for

To Understand (or Teach) CIs, Adopt an Estimation Mindset

Update 8 June. Some minor tweaks. Addition of the full reference for two papers mentioned. Of course I would say that, wouldn’t I?! It’s the basis of ITNS and a new-statistics approach. But the latest issue of SERJ adds a

The TAS Articles: Geoff’s Take

Ditching Statistical Significance: The Most Talked-About Paper Ever?

Well, that might be a stretch, but in relation to the Nature Comment that Bob and I signed to support, Altmetric tweeted: John Ioannidis published this criticism of the Comment, with the subtitle Do Not Abandon Significance. Much of what

Moving Beyond p < .05: The Latest

A couple of days ago, the three authors of the Nature paper accompanying the special issue of TAS on moving beyond p < .05 sent the update below. (See below for lots of links.) We are writing with a brief

Journal Articles Without p Values

Once we have a CI, a p value adds nothing, and is likely to mislead and to tempt the writer or readers to fall back into mere dichotomous decision making (boo!). So let’s simply use estimation and never report p

A Second Edition of ITNS? Here’s the Latest

Our first blog post about a possible second edition of ITNS is here. All the comments I made there, and the questions I asked, remain relevant. We’ve had some very useful feedback and suggestions, but we’d love more. You could

Internal Meta-Analysis: Useful or Disastrous?

A recent powerful blog post (see below) against internal meta-analysis prompts me to ask the question above. (Actually, Steve Lindsay prompted me to write this post; thanks Steve.) In ITNS we say, on p. 243: “To carry out a meta-analysis

Draw Pictures to Improve Learning?

In ITNS we included a short section near the start describing good strategies for learning, based on empirical studies. Scattered through the book are reminders and encouragement to use the effective strategies. Now, just as we’re thinking about possible improvements

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