Category: NHST

Abandon Statistical Significance!

That’s the title of a paper accepted for publication in The American Statistician. (I confess that I added the “!”) The paper is here. Scroll down below to see the abstract. The paper boasts an interdisciplinary team of authors, including

Open Science DownUnder: Simine Comes to Town

A week or two ago Simine Vazire was in town. Fiona Fidler organised a great Open Science jamboree to celebrate. The program is here and a few of the sets of slides are here. Simine on the credibility revolution First

Internal Meta-Analysis: Useful or Disastrous?

A recent powerful blog post (see below) against internal meta-analysis prompts me to ask the question above. (Actually, Steve Lindsay prompted me to write this post; thanks Steve.) In ITNS we say, on p. 243: “To carry out a meta-analysis

We’ve Been Here Before: The Replication Crisis over the Pygmalion Effect

[UPDATE: Thanks to twitter I came across this marvelous book(Jussim, 2012) that does a great job explaining the Pygmalion effect, the controversy around it, and the overall state of research on expectancy effects.  I’ve amended parts of this post based on

Pre-Print – The New Statistics for Better Science

We have a new preprint on how the New Statistics can save the world (sort of):  https://psyarxiv.com/3mztg  It’s for a special issue of the American Statistician on the them of  “Beyond p values”. We welcome your feedback on via email, twitter (@TheNewStats),

Banning p values? The journal ‘Political Analysis’ does it

Back in the 1980s, epidemiologist Kenneth Rothman was a leader of those trying to persuade researchers across medicine and the biosciences to use CIs routinely. The campaign was successful to the extent that the International Council of Medical Editors stated

Statisticians see the light–Hooray!

“Scientific Method for the Twenty-First Century: A World Beyond p

Video – Getting started with the New Statistics and Open Science

This fall I (Bob) was invited to give a talk at Indiana University as part of a series on good science and statistical practice organized by the university’s Social Science Research Commons (SSRC).  The SSRC is like a core facility

The ASA Symposium on Statistical Inference: Bob’s great talk

“A world beyond p < .05." That's the subtitle for the ASA Symposium on Statistical Inference, which ran last month. Bob was there and recently posted a brief initial report. I wasn’t there, alas, but I’ve now had three independent

Adventures in Replication – Reviewers don’t want to believe disappointing replication results

Trying to publish replication results is difficult.  Even when the original evidence is very weak or uncertain, reviewers tend to look for reasons to explain away a smaller effect in the replication.  If nothing comes to mind, reviewers may even

Top