Category: Open Science

ITNS–A New Review on Amazon

The ITNS page on Amazon (U.S.) is here. Scroll down to see the 4 reviews by readers. Recently a five-star review was added by Edoardo Zamuner. Here it is: “I am an experimental psychologist with training in NHST. Cumming’s book

It’s not just Psychology: Questionable Research Practices in Ecology

Today’s fine article from The Conversation is: Our survey found ‘questionable research practices’ by ecologists and biologists – here’s what that means The authors are Fiona Fidler and Hannah Fraser, of The University of Melbourne. Fidler and Fraser surveyed 807

The National Association of Scholars Weighs in on ‘The Irreproducibility Crisis’

STOP PRESS: Since first writing this post I’ve discovered that all may not be as it seems–especially to me at the other end of the Earth. As ever, we need to be vigilant for any dark forces wishing to use

Randomistas: Dare we hope for evidence-based decisions in public life?

I’ve just listened to a great 20-min podcast, published by The Conversation. The podcast is here. It’s an interview by my colleague Fiona Fidler with Anthony Leigh, about his recently released book: Randomistas: How Radical Researchers Changed Our World. Published

Sample-size planning – a short video

Here’s a short talk I gave at the 2017 Society for Neuroscience meeting on sample size planning.  The talk discusses: Why you should plan your sample sizes in advance What not to do (how some common approaches can lead you

Open Science: This Time in Orthodontics

Last month it was the Antarctic Scientists, this month the Orthodontists, and once again I had a most enjoyable time. Lindsay my wife and I are just back from 5 days in Sydney. I was speaking at the 26th Australian

Open Science Goes to the Antarctic–Well, Nearly

Have you ever met a Professor of Seaweed? No, nor had I, but now I have: Catriona Hurd. More about her in a moment. I’m just back from two highly enjoyable days visiting IMAS, the Institute of Marine and Antarctic

Not replicable, but citable

What happens to the reputation of a paper when the results reported cannot be replicated? Here’s a graph of citations/year from two studies–an original and a replication study that found little to no effect.  It’s just one example, but it

It’s not all bad news

Here’s a cool pre-print examining the quality of evidence in studies of the genetics of short-term memory in fruit flies (Tumkaya, Ott, & Claridge-Chang, 2018).  The paper conducts a meta-analysis of different genes that have been linked to altered olfactory

Pre-registration challenge met!

I (Bob) have met the pre-registration challenge!  I pre-registered a set of replication studies (Calin-Jageman, 2018), and now that they are published, I’ve received confirmation from the Center for Open Science that I have met the challenge–a check for $1,000

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