Category: Open Science

Replication: ‘Psychological Science’ does the right thing

I have been enjoying Bob’s series of posts about replication. (Go to our home page and scroll down to see links and a few lines of text about each of the 5 posts, with title starting ‘Adventures in Replication’.) Actually,

Posted in Open Science, Replication, The New Statistics

Brain Stimulation – Can we trust the empirical record?

Brain stimulation research has been exploding in neuroscience.  First came the rapid adoption of Transcranial Magnetic Stimulation (TMS), a technique in which powerful magnetic fields are used to create inductive currents within the skull.  More recently, Direct Current Stimulation (DCS)

Posted in Applied research, Open Science, Replication

Something a bit different: maintaining memories

I’m wondering off the topic of the New Statistics today just to mention that my lab has published a new paper that characterizes the the changes in gene expression that accompany storing and maintaining a new long-term memory  (Conte et

Posted in Open Science, Uncategorized

Red, Romance, and Replication

I have a new replication paper out today, a collaboration with DU student Elle Lehmann (Lehmann & Calin-Jageman, 2017) .  The OSF page for the paper with all the materials and data is here: https://osf.io/j3fyq/ (Calin-Jageman & Lehmann, 2015) The

Posted in Open Science, Replication

“The best conference…”: More about SIPS

Here’s more about the recent SIPS Conference, from my colleague Fiona Fidler who was clever enough to be there. (Some background: Fiona, of The University of Melbourne, is among other things a psychologist, ecologist, and historian of science. Her PhD

Posted in Open Science

Today’s news from SIPS: Getting better…

A while ago I wrote about SIPS. Today came an email following the second SIPS meeting, a couple of weeks ago at COS in Charlottesville, VA. Below is some of the email: “We had an invigorating conference, and are humbled

Posted in Open Science

Open Science is not all the same: What archaeology can teach us

There’s no simple dot point way to adopt Open Science and improve the trustworthiness of science. A fascinating story from archaeology illustrates that reality nicely. First, the story. Archaeologists have long studied when the out-of-Africa spreading of modern humans first

Posted in Applied research, Open Science

Pictures of uncertainty: Dancing with Pierre in Paris

A while back I wrote a post about Pierre Dragicevic, an HCI researcher in Paris who for years has been working to persuade researchers in his field to adopt better statistical methods. I wrote about his wonderful talk that presents

Posted in ITNS, Open Science, Replication, Statistical graphics, Teaching

To what extent do new statistical guidelines change statistical practice?

In 2012 the Psychonomic Society (PS) adopted a set of forward-thinking guidelines for the use of statistics in its journals . The guidelines stressed the use of a priori sample-size planning, the reporting of effect sizes, and the use of confidence intervals

Posted in Open Science, Stats tools, The New Statistics

From NHST to the New Statistics — How do we get there?

APS just wrapped up.  Geoff and I were privileges to help host a symposium on making progress moving the field away from p values towards the New Statistics.  Our co-conspirators were fellow text-book author Susan Nolan, Psychological Science editor Stephen

Posted in NHST, Open Science, Teaching, The New Statistics