Category: Open Science

Open Science DownUnder: Simine Comes to Town

A week or two ago Simine Vazire was in town. Fiona Fidler organised a great Open Science jamboree to celebrate. The program is here and a few of the sets of slides are here. Simine on the credibility revolution First

Cabbage? Open Science and cardiothoracic surgery

“The best thing about being a statistician is that you get to play in everyone’s backyard.” –a well-known quote from John Tukey. Cabbage? That’s CABG–see below. A week or so ago Lindy and I spent a very enjoyable 5 days

Internal Meta-Analysis: Useful or Disastrous?

A recent powerful blog post (see below) against internal meta-analysis prompts me to ask the question above. (Actually, Steve Lindsay prompted me to write this post; thanks Steve.) In ITNS we say, on p. 243: “To carry out a meta-analysis

Eating Disorders Research: Open Science and The New Statistics

I’m in Sydney, the great Manly surf beach just over the road. It’s an easy ferry ride to the Opera House and city centre. Lindy and I started this trip up from Melbourne with a few days with a cousin,

ITNS–The Second Edition!

Routledge, our publisher, has started planning for a second edition. That’s very exciting news! The only problem is that Bob and I can’t think of anything that needs improving. Ha! But, seriously, we’d love to hear from you about things

Open Science DownUnder — Fiona Fidler reports

Last week, the 2018 Australasian Open Science Conference was held in Brisbane at the University of Queensland: The first conference in Oz on the themes of Open Science and how to improve how science is done. They expected 40 and

Effect Sizes for Open Science

For the last 20 years or so, many journals have emphasised the reporting of effect sizes. The new statistics emphasised also the reporting of CIs on those effect sizes. Now Open Science places effect sizes, CIs, and their interpretation centre

APS in San Fran 2: Symposium on Teaching the New Stats

Our symposium was titled Open Science and Its Statistics: What We Need to Teach Now. The room wasn’t large, but it was packed, standing room only. I thought the energy was terrific. There were four presentations, as below. Bob and

The Perils of MTurk, Part 1: Fuel to the Publication Bias Fire?

It’s not going to be a popular opinion, but I think MTurk has become a danger to sound psychological science.  This breaks my heart.  MTurk has helped transform my career for the better.  Moreover, MTurk participants are amazing: they are

Tony Hak 1950-2018: Champion of Better Methods, Better Statistics

It was a shock to receive the very sad news that Tony Hak died last week, unexpectedly. Too young! And only 3 years into an active retirement. Tony was an Emeritus Associate Professor, having retired in 2015 from the Department

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