Category: Replication

Pre-Print – The New Statistics for Better Science

We have a new preprint on how the New Statistics can save the world (sort of):  https://psyarxiv.com/3mztg  It’s for a special issue of the American Statistician on the them of  “Beyond p values”. We welcome your feedback on via email, twitter (@TheNewStats),

Not replicable, but citable

What happens to the reputation of a paper when the results reported cannot be replicated? Here’s a graph of citations/year from two studies–an original and a replication study that found little to no effect.  It’s just one example, but it

It’s not all bad news

Here’s a cool pre-print examining the quality of evidence in studies of the genetics of short-term memory in fruit flies (Tumkaya, Ott, & Claridge-Chang, 2018).  The paper conducts a meta-analysis of different genes that have been linked to altered olfactory

Pre-registration challenge met!

I (Bob) have met the pre-registration challenge!  I pre-registered a set of replication studies (Calin-Jageman, 2018), and now that they are published, I’ve received confirmation from the Center for Open Science that I have met the challenge–a check for $1,000

Say It in Song: Go Forth and Replicate!

Jon Grahe, of Pacific Lutheran University, is an enthusiastic advocate for Open Science and, especially, for student participation in doing Open Science as a key part of education. The Collaborative Replication and Education Project (CREP, pronounced “krape”) is a great

Teaching the Forest Plot–What Do You Think?

I’ve been a bit obsessed with the forest plot for, I’d guess, close to 20 years. Partly because I love pictures, partly because the forest plot can tell us so much. I regard it as the beautiful face of meta-analysis.

Memories fade..but something remains

This isn’t a statistics post–it’s about Bob’s neuroscience research.  Most long-term memories are ‘forgotten’–meaning that recall becomes less and less likely.  Psychologists have long known, though, that forgetting is complex, and that fragments of a memory can remain.  For example,

You’ve got to build your love on a solid foundation– p < .05 does not mean you have enough data to have done good science

Joe Tex sang it well: You’ve got to build your love on a solid foundation. Applied to science: you should build a research program that is robust, generative, and fruitful.. a solid foundation for exploring the hidden mechanisms at work

Replication: ‘Psychological Science’ does the right thing

I have been enjoying Bob’s series of posts about replication. (Go to our home page and scroll down to see links and a few lines of text about each of the 5 posts, with title starting ‘Adventures in Replication’.) Actually,

Adventures in Replication – Reviewers don’t want to believe disappointing replication results

Trying to publish replication results is difficult.  Even when the original evidence is very weak or uncertain, reviewers tend to look for reasons to explain away a smaller effect in the replication.  If nothing comes to mind, reviewers may even

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