Category: Replication

Sample-size planning – a short video

Here’s a short talk I gave at the 2017 Society for Neuroscience meeting on sample size planning.  The talk discusses: Why you should plan your sample sizes in advance What not to do (how some common approaches can lead you

Open Science: This Time in Orthodontics

Last month it was the Antarctic Scientists, this month the Orthodontists, and once again I had a most enjoyable time. Lindsay my wife and I are just back from 5 days in Sydney. I was speaking at the 26th Australian

The complexity of measuring a ‘simple’ behavior (novelty preference tests seem terrible)

The replication crisis isn’t just about sample size and statistical inference.  Another key issue is measurement: the process of turning observations into quantitative statements about our sample.  It’s tricky.  In many cases we’ve run before we learned to walk, adopting methods

Pre-Print – The New Statistics for Better Science

We have a new preprint on how the New Statistics can save the world (sort of):  https://psyarxiv.com/3mztg  It’s for a special issue of the American Statistician on the them of  “Beyond p values”. We welcome your feedback on via email, twitter (@TheNewStats),

Not replicable, but citable

What happens to the reputation of a paper when the results reported cannot be replicated? Here’s a graph of citations/year from two studies–an original and a replication study that found little to no effect.  It’s just one example, but it

It’s not all bad news

Here’s a cool pre-print examining the quality of evidence in studies of the genetics of short-term memory in fruit flies (Tumkaya, Ott, & Claridge-Chang, 2018).  The paper conducts a meta-analysis of different genes that have been linked to altered olfactory

Pre-registration challenge met!

I (Bob) have met the pre-registration challenge!  I pre-registered a set of replication studies (Calin-Jageman, 2018), and now that they are published, I’ve received confirmation from the Center for Open Science that I have met the challenge–a check for $1,000

Say It in Song: Go Forth and Replicate!

Jon Grahe, of Pacific Lutheran University, is an enthusiastic advocate for Open Science and, especially, for student participation in doing Open Science as a key part of education. The Collaborative Replication and Education Project (CREP, pronounced “krape”) is a great

Teaching the Forest Plot–What Do You Think?

I’ve been a bit obsessed with the forest plot for, I’d guess, close to 20 years. Partly because I love pictures, partly because the forest plot can tell us so much. I regard it as the beautiful face of meta-analysis.

Memories fade..but something remains

This isn’t a statistics post–it’s about Bob’s neuroscience research.  Most long-term memories are ‘forgotten’–meaning that recall becomes less and less likely.  Psychologists have long known, though, that forgetting is complex, and that fragments of a memory can remain.  For example,

Top