Category: Replication

Internal Meta-Analysis: Useful or Disastrous?

A recent powerful blog post (see below) against internal meta-analysis prompts me to ask the question above. (Actually, Steve Lindsay prompted me to write this post; thanks Steve.) In ITNS we say, on p. 243: “To carry out a meta-analysis

Eating Disorders Research: Open Science and The New Statistics

I’m in Sydney, the great Manly surf beach just over the road. It’s an easy ferry ride to the Opera House and city centre. Lindy and I started this trip up from Melbourne with a few days with a cousin,

Cochrane: Matthew Page Wins the Prize!

Years ago, Matthew Page was a student in the School of Psychological Science at La Trobe University (in Melbourne), working with Fiona Fidler and me. He somehow (!) became interested in research methods and practices, especially as related to meta-analysis.

The Perils of MTurk, Part 1: Fuel to the Publication Bias Fire?

It’s not going to be a popular opinion, but I think MTurk has become a danger to sound psychological science.  This breaks my heart.  MTurk has helped transform my career for the better.  Moreover, MTurk participants are amazing: they are

We’ve Been Here Before: The Replication Crisis over the Pygmalion Effect

[UPDATE: Thanks to twitter I came across this marvelous book(Jussim, 2012) that does a great job explaining the Pygmalion effect, the controversy around it, and the overall state of research on expectancy effects.  I’ve amended parts of this post based on

Measuring Heterogeneity in Meta-Analysis: The Diamond Ratio (DR)

This is a post about the Diamond Ratio (DR), a simple measure of the extent of heterogeneity in a meta-analysis. We introduced the DR in ITNS. But first, some background. Fixed Effect (FE) model for meta-analysis The diamond at the

Sample-size planning – a short video

Here’s a short talk I gave at the 2017 Society for Neuroscience meeting on sample size planning.  The talk discusses: Why you should plan your sample sizes in advance What not to do (how some common approaches can lead you

Open Science: This Time in Orthodontics

Last month it was the Antarctic Scientists, this month the Orthodontists, and once again I had a most enjoyable time. Lindsay my wife and I are just back from 5 days in Sydney. I was speaking at the 26th Australian

The complexity of measuring a ‘simple’ behavior (novelty preference tests seem terrible)

The replication crisis isn’t just about sample size and statistical inference.  Another key issue is measurement: the process of turning observations into quantitative statements about our sample.  It’s tricky.  In many cases we’ve run before we learned to walk, adopting methods

Pre-Print – The New Statistics for Better Science

We have a new preprint on how the New Statistics can save the world (sort of):  https://psyarxiv.com/3mztg  It’s for a special issue of the American Statistician on the them of  “Beyond p values”. We welcome your feedback on via email, twitter (@TheNewStats),

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