Category: Statistical graphics

The Multiverse! Dances, and More, From Pierre in Paris

Our Open Science superego tells us that we must preregister our data analysis plan, follow that plan exactly, then emphasise just those results as most believable. Death to cherry-picking! Yay! The Multiverse But one of the advantages of open data

Statistical Cognition: An Invitation

Statistical Cognition (SC) is the study of how people understand–or, quite often, misunderstand–statistical concepts or presentations. Is it better to report results using numbers, or graphs? Are confidence intervals (CIs) appreciated better if shown as error bars in a graph

APS in San Fran 3: Workshop on Teaching the New Stats

Tamarah Smith and Bob presented a workshop on Teaching the New Stats to an almost sold-out crowd. I wasn’t there, but by all reports it went extremely well. Such a workshop seems to me a terrific way to help interested

The Beautiful Face of a Confidence Interval: The Cat’s Eye Picture

Pawel (Pav) Kalinowski and Jerry Lai completed their PhDs a few years back. A recently published Frontiers article (citation below) reports what was primarily Pav’s research on how people understand confidence intervals (CIs). The short version is “for many people,

Measuring Heterogeneity in Meta-Analysis: The Diamond Ratio (DR)

This is a post about the Diamond Ratio (DR), a simple measure of the extent of heterogeneity in a meta-analysis. We introduced the DR in ITNS. But first, some background. Fixed Effect (FE) model for meta-analysis The diamond at the

Say It in Song: Go Forth and Replicate!

Jon Grahe, of Pacific Lutheran University, is an enthusiastic advocate for Open Science and, especially, for student participation in doing Open Science as a key part of education. The Collaborative Replication and Education Project (CREP, pronounced “krape”) is a great

Teaching the Forest Plot–What Do You Think?

I’ve been a bit obsessed with the forest plot for, I’d guess, close to 20 years. Partly because I love pictures, partly because the forest plot can tell us so much. I regard it as the beautiful face of meta-analysis.

Adventures in Replication: p values and Illusions of Incompatibility

Here’s an idea I run into a lot in peer reviews of replication studies: If the original study found p < .05 but the replication found p > .05, then the results are incompatible and additional research is needed to

Pictures of uncertainty: Dancing with Pierre in Paris

A while back I wrote a post about Pierre Dragicevic, an HCI researcher in Paris who for years has been working to persuade researchers in his field to adopt better statistical methods. I wrote about his wonderful talk that presents

What the datasaurus tells us: Data pictures are cool

In various places in ITNS, especially Chapter 11 (Correlation) we discuss how important it is to make good pictures of data, to reveal what’s really going on. Calculating a few summary statistics–or even CIs–often just doesn’t do the job. Many

Top