Category: Teaching

ITNS–A New Review on Amazon

The ITNS page on Amazon (U.S.) is here. Scroll down to see the 4 reviews by readers. Recently a five-star review was added by Edoardo Zamuner. Here it is: “I am an experimental psychologist with training in NHST. Cumming’s book

The Beautiful Face of a Confidence Interval: The Cat’s Eye Picture

Pawel (Pav) Kalinowski and Jerry Lai completed their PhDs a few years back. A recently published Frontiers article (citation below) reports what was primarily Pav’s research on how people understand confidence intervals (CIs). The short version is “for many people,

Measuring Heterogeneity in Meta-Analysis: The Diamond Ratio (DR)

This is a post about the Diamond Ratio (DR), a simple measure of the extent of heterogeneity in a meta-analysis. We introduced the DR in ITNS. But first, some background. Fixed Effect (FE) model for meta-analysis The diamond at the

Open Science: This Time in Orthodontics

Last month it was the Antarctic Scientists, this month the Orthodontists, and once again I had a most enjoyable time. Lindsay my wife and I are just back from 5 days in Sydney. I was speaking at the 26th Australian

Why effect sizes? A tutorial (especially for Neuroscientists)

The New Statistics emphasizes effect sizes, confidence intervals, meta-analysis, and Open Science.  There’s a lot of momentum to adopt this change of focus.  For example, the APA recently released new guidelines for reporting quantitative research and throughout it emphasizes reporting

Open Science Leaders: Dan and Steve Tell Their Stories

BTW, have you noticed that Bob has set up NewStatistics on Twitter–scroll down and see the right hand side bar. Do follow us and help spread the word. Thanks! Dan Simons may be best known as the co-author of the

Say It in Song: Go Forth and Replicate!

Jon Grahe, of Pacific Lutheran University, is an enthusiastic advocate for Open Science and, especially, for student participation in doing Open Science as a key part of education. The Collaborative Replication and Education Project (CREP, pronounced “krape”) is a great

Some Questions–Would You Care to Comment?

Blogs sometimes either elicit lots of comments, or they don’t. While writing, I’m always wondering how readers might react, what they (you) might be thinking. In my most recent post I asked about experiences or thoughts readers might have about

Teaching the Forest Plot–What Do You Think?

I’ve been a bit obsessed with the forest plot for, I’d guess, close to 20 years. Partly because I love pictures, partly because the forest plot can tell us so much. I regard it as the beautiful face of meta-analysis.

See you in San Francisco?

I’m delighted to report that our symposium proposed for the APS Convention next May has been accepted. (BTW if you visit that site for the Convention, note the happy people in the top centre pic–our panel from the 2017 Convention.)

Top