Category: Teaching

Open Science Leaders: Dan and Steve Tell Their Stories

BTW, have you noticed that Bob has set up NewStatistics on Twitter–scroll down and see the right hand side bar. Do follow us and help spread the word. Thanks! Dan Simons may be best known as the co-author of the

Say It in Song: Go Forth and Replicate!

Jon Grahe, of Pacific Lutheran University, is an enthusiastic advocate for Open Science and, especially, for student participation in doing Open Science as a key part of education. The Collaborative Replication and Education Project (CREP, pronounced “krape”) is a great

Some Questions–Would You Care to Comment?

Blogs sometimes either elicit lots of comments, or they don’t. While writing, I’m always wondering how readers might react, what they (you) might be thinking. In my most recent post I asked about experiences or thoughts readers might have about

Teaching the Forest Plot–What Do You Think?

I’ve been a bit obsessed with the forest plot for, I’d guess, close to 20 years. Partly because I love pictures, partly because the forest plot can tell us so much. I regard it as the beautiful face of meta-analysis.

See you in San Francisco?

I’m delighted to report that our symposium proposed for the APS Convention next May has been accepted. (BTW if you visit that site for the Convention, note the happy people in the top centre pic–our panel from the 2017 Convention.)

Open Science and The New Statistics: Be Happy!

In May this year at the APS Convention in Boston, Bob and I ran a symposium with the title From NHST to The New Statistics: How do We Get There? It was great fun. There is a summary here. Next

Video – Getting started with the New Statistics and Open Science

This fall I (Bob) was invited to give a talk at Indiana University as part of a series on good science and statistical practice organized by the university’s Social Science Research Commons (SSRC).  The SSRC is like a core facility

The New Statistics for Neuroscientists

This summer I (Bob) was asked to write a series of perspective pieces on statistical issues for the Journal of Undergraduate Neuroscience. My first effort has just been published (Calin-Jageman, 2017)–it is a call for neuroscience education to shift away

Beyond p values – Dispatches from the ASA symposium on statistical inference

The next couple of posts will be about my experience at the ASA conference on statistical inference: A World Beyond p < .05. The first session featured Steve Goodman and John Ioannidis (who Skyped in from Australia).  One highlight was

The joy of many disciplines

One of the great things about working in psychology, or statistics, or–just imagine!– both, is that you can get to play in the backyards of many other folks. As science becomes more and more fragmented, and many researchers feel that

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