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The Cookie-Monster Study: The highly influential memory of a long-lost study

In psychology, there are a few studies so famous and influential that they have proper names: The Good Samaritan Study, the Asch Obedience Study, the Marshmallow test, etc, etc. Approaching this echelon is the “Cookie Monster Study”, an increasingly-famous study

Reply to Lakens: The correctly-used p value needs an effect size and CI

Updated 5/21: fixed a typo, added a section on when p > .05 demonstrates a negligible effect, and added a figure at the end. Daniel Lakens recently posted a pre-print with a rousing defense of the much-maligned p-value: In essence, the

Joining the fractious debate over how to do science best

At the end of the month (March 2019) the American Statistical Association will publish a special issue on statistical inference “after p values”. The goal of the issue is to focus on the statistical “dos” rather than statistical “don’ts”. Across

Statistical Cognition: An Invitation

Statistical Cognition (SC) is the study of how people understand–or, quite often, misunderstand–statistical concepts or presentations. Is it better to report results using numbers, or graphs? Are confidence intervals (CIs) appreciated better if shown as error bars in a graph

Sizing up behavioral neuroscience – a meta-analysis of the fear-conditioning literature

Inadequate sample sizes are kryptonite to good science–they produce waste, spurious results, and inflated effect sizes.  Doing science with an inadequate sample is worse than doing nothing.  In the neurosciences, large-scale surveys of the literature show that inadequate sample sizes

Cochrane: Matthew Page Wins the Prize!

Years ago, Matthew Page was a student in the School of Psychological Science at La Trobe University (in Melbourne), working with Fiona Fidler and me. He somehow (!) became interested in research methods and practices, especially as related to meta-analysis.

Positive Controls for Psychology – My pitch for a SIPS project

Positive controls are one of the most useful tools for ensuring interpretable and fruitful research.  Strangely, though, positive controls are rarely used in psychological research.  That’s a shame, but also an opportunity–it would be an easy but substantial improvement for

APS in San Fran 1: Open Science is Maturing

It was, as ever, a great pleasure to catch up with Bob last weekend. We were in San Francisco for the APS Convention. That convention has been for the last five years or so a hotbed of discussion about Open

Badges, Badges, Badges: Open Science on the March

Here are two screen pics from today’s notice about the latest issue of Psychological Science. Four of the first five articles earned all three badges, including Pre-reg! Gold! (OK, by showing just those five I’m cherry picking, but other articles

Randomistas: Dare we hope for evidence-based decisions in public life?

I’ve just listened to a great 20-min podcast, published by The Conversation. The podcast is here. It’s an interview by my colleague Fiona Fidler with Anthony Leigh, about his recently released book: Randomistas: How Radical Researchers Changed Our World. Published

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