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Cochrane: Matthew Page Wins the Prize!

Years ago, Matthew Page was a student in the School of Psychological Science at La Trobe University (in Melbourne), working with Fiona Fidler and me. He somehow (!) became interested in research methods and practices, especially as related to meta-analysis.

Positive Controls for Psychology – My pitch for a SIPS project

Positive controls are one of the most useful tools for ensuring interpretable and fruitful research.  Strangely, though, positive controls are rarely used in psychological research.  That’s a shame, but also an opportunity–it would be an easy but substantial improvement for

APS in San Fran 1: Open Science is Maturing

It was, as ever, a great pleasure to catch up with Bob last weekend. We were in San Francisco for the APS Convention. That convention has been for the last five years or so a hotbed of discussion about Open

Badges, Badges, Badges: Open Science on the March

Here are two screen pics from today’s notice about the latest issue of Psychological Science. Four of the first five articles earned all three badges, including Pre-reg! Gold! (OK, by showing just those five I’m cherry picking, but other articles

Randomistas: Dare we hope for evidence-based decisions in public life?

I’ve just listened to a great 20-min podcast, published by The Conversation. The podcast is here. It’s an interview by my colleague Fiona Fidler with Anthony Leigh, about his recently released book: Randomistas: How Radical Researchers Changed Our World. Published

What Medicine Can Teach Us About Low Probabilities: A Personal Experience

I’m recently home after 10 days in hospital. It was meant to be a simple procedure, home the next morning, but two low probability complications arose. I was largely out to it for a few days, but then I was

Pre-registration challenge met!

I (Bob) have met the pre-registration challenge!  I pre-registered a set of replication studies (Calin-Jageman, 2018), and now that they are published, I’ve received confirmation from the Center for Open Science that I have met the challenge–a check for $1,000

A bracing call for better science when linking genes to brain function

There’s a fantastic editorial out in the European Journal of Neuroscience (Mitchell, 2018) arguing that standards need to be much higher in the field of neurogenomics–that’s the study of how genes relate to differences in brain structure and function. The

Gaining expertise doesn’t have to close your mind–another adventure in replication

You may have seen it on the news: being an expert makes you close-minded.  This was circa 2015, and the news reports were about this paper (Ottati, Price, Wilson, & Sumaktoyo, 2015) by Victor Ottati’s group, published in JESP.  The paper

Say It in Song: Go Forth and Replicate!

Jon Grahe, of Pacific Lutheran University, is an enthusiastic advocate for Open Science and, especially, for student participation in doing Open Science as a key part of education. The Collaborative Replication and Education Project (CREP, pronounced “krape”) is a great

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