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Pre-registration challenge met!

I (Bob) have met the pre-registration challenge!  I pre-registered a set of replication studies (Calin-Jageman, 2018), and now that they are published, I’ve received confirmation from the Center for Open Science that I have met the challenge–a check for $1,000

A bracing call for better science when linking genes to brain function

There’s a fantastic editorial out in the European Journal of Neuroscience (Mitchell, 2018) arguing that standards need to be much higher in the field of neurogenomics–that’s the study of how genes relate to differences in brain structure and function. The

Gaining expertise doesn’t have to close your mind–another adventure in replication

You may have seen it on the news: being an expert makes you close-minded.  This was circa 2015, and the news reports were about this paper (Ottati, Price, Wilson, & Sumaktoyo, 2015) by Victor Ottati’s group, published in JESP.  The paper

Say It in Song: Go Forth and Replicate!

Jon Grahe, of Pacific Lutheran University, is an enthusiastic advocate for Open Science and, especially, for student participation in doing Open Science as a key part of education. The Collaborative Replication and Education Project (CREP, pronounced “krape”) is a great

Enthusiasm for teaching and learning

It’s a joy to be with faculty who are deeply enthusiastic about teaching and about student learning. I’m just back from AusPLAT (Australian Psychology Learning and Teaching), the first Australian conference on learning and teaching, under the auspices of the

Something a bit different: maintaining memories

I’m wondering off the topic of the New Statistics today just to mention that my lab has published a new paper that characterizes the the changes in gene expression that accompany storing and maintaining a new long-term memory  (Conte et

Funnel plots, publication bias, and the power of blogs

On March 21, 2017 Uri Simonsohn revealed an interesting new blog post on funnel plots, arguing based on some simulations that they are not as useful for detecting publication bias as might be thought http://datacolada.org/58.  It’s an interesting post, and

Don’t fool yourself: Facilitated Communication continues to be a cautionary tale

When I (Bob) was an undergrad, I took methods/stats in the psychology department.  I wasn’t a psych major, but I wanted to take a class on brain and behavior, and I was told I had to take methods/stats first.  At

The long road towards clinical trials registries – Sackler Colloquim on Reproducibility Field Report 4

Science only works if we have the whole story. This is especially important in clinical trials, where the results of these studies are used to guide medical practice.  Unfortunately, getting the whole story can be difficult–there are strong incentives to

Science Spin – Sackler Colloquim on Reproducibility Field Report 3

The conference on reproducibility I (Bob) attended in early March was so invigorating I figured I would spread these posts out.  Here’s the next installment. Another good talk on the first day was from Isabelle Boutron, an MD PhD at

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